Virtual Stormwater Summit

February 17–18, 2021
10 a.m.–2 p.m. CT

The PWX@Home Stormwater Summit features seven virtual education sessions selected by APWA’s Water Resources Management Committee for presentation at PWX 2020. The two-day event program features presenters sharing agency perspectives and experiences on topics such as project funding strategies; implementation of new technologies, methods for building flood resilient communities, including green infrastructure; applications of IoT water level sensors; creating an open-source web tool; and simultaneously handling alternative project delivery methods. Presenters will highlight successes as well as share lessons learned. Attendees will have the opportunity to interact with presenters via a question-and-answer opportunity at the end of each session, as well as network and learn from other attendees via table discussions, a unique feature within the Summit platform.

Participants are eligible for 0.6 CEUs upon completion of this program.

Contact education@apwa.net with questions or large group (15+ registrants) registration inquiries.

Pricing

$85 Member | $110 Non-Member
Group pricing is available

Schedule

Session times are in CST.

Wednesday, February 17

10:00–10:10 a.m.
Welcome/Opening Remarks

10:10–11:00 a.m.
Session 1: How Will We Find Enough Money to Fund Stormwater Projects? Public-Private Partnerships, Local Ballot Measures, and More
Speakers: Katie Harrel, Vik Bapna, Charles Herbertson, Matthew Frary

11:00–11:25 a.m.
Caffeinate & Collaborate – This will be time for participants to have conversations about current issues in Stormwater Management and network with other participants.

11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Session 2: Leveraging Technology to Increase Efficiency and Welcome the Next Generation of Utility Employees
Speakers: Scott Medeiros, David Billips

12:20–12:50 p.m.
LUNCH BREAK – Option for attendees to join peers in the Networking Lounge for conversation and networking or step away from their computers to eat, catch up on emails, take/return phone calls, etc.

12:55–1:45 p.m.
Session 3: City of New Orleans Green Infrastructure from Concept to Constructability
Speakers: Erika Boerr, Jessica Watts

1:50–2:00 p.m.
Closing Remarks


Thursday, February 18

10:00–10:10 a.m.
Welcome to Day 2/Opening Remarks

10:10–11:00 a.m.
Session 1: Solving Urban Flooding in Vegas – How to Build Flood Resilient Communities at a Regional Level
Speaker: Brian Rowley, Andrew Trelease

11:00–11:25 a.m.
Caffeinate & Collaborate – This will be time for participants to have conversations about current issues in Stormwater Management and network with other participants.

11:30–11:55 a.m.
Session 2a: Stormwater Applications of IoT Level Sensors
Speakers: Ross Miller, Randy Weatherspoon

12:00–12:25 p.m.
Session 2b:  Orange County Stormwater Tools: Asset Management and Watershed Plan Implementation through an Open-Source Application
Speakers: Cindy Rivers, Eric Rademacher

12:25–12:55 p.m.
LUNCH BREAK – Option for attendees to join peers in the Networking Lounge for conversation and networking or step away from their computers to eat, catch up on emails, take/return phone calls, etc.

1:00–1:50 p.m.
Session 3: Leveraging Two Alternative Project Delivery Methods for a Complex Stormwater Project in Denver (50 minutes w/Q&A)
Speakers: Ryan Crum, Amy Foreman, Jason Rutt, Sam Stevens

1:55–2:00 p.m.
Closing Remarks

Education Sessions

City of New Orleans Green Infrastructure from Concept to Constructability

A properly sized and functioning stormwater system is essential to the protection of public, property, and infrastructure in any metropolitan area. This is especially true in the City of New Orleans (City) where local topography presents a unique challenge for stormwater management. The approach to addressing localized flooding in the two city areas was to design a distributed green infrastructure system using public open space and City ROW to manage stormwater runoff volumes. The methodology employed to achieve optimal solutions was highly iterative and involved significant collaboration among engineering, landscape architecture, and public works professionals working as a team. Green Infrastructure locations and preliminary water detention capacities were input into SWMM models for each neighborhood area. Models were run for multiple storms, and resultant flood levels were mapped. The facilities with the greatest benefits and fewest potential conflicts were chosen, as well as other pilot projects that could change the paradigm on how the City develops in the future. It is within these pilot projects that challenges of integrating green infrastructure into the built-out urban environment were met, including issues with: vibration mitigation, design practices, specifications, and testing for compaction of open-graded aggregate, design at the intersection of sanitary sewer and green infrastructure, and long-term maintenance of green infrastructure system.

Proficiency Level: Applied

Learning Objectives
1. Describe the potential of green infrastructure in New Orleans.
2. Identify applications where green infrastructure requires changes standard public works design.
3. Integrate lessons learned into their own municipality’s green infrastructure program.


How Will We Find Enough Money to Fund Stormwater Projects? Public-Private Partnerships, Local Ballot Measures, and More

Brought to you in part by:

Stormwater quality continues to be a top priority, especially in developed communities. Agencies are faced with a variety of requirements in association with National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits and Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs). One concern for agencies across this nation is money; how will they pay for stormwater projects on top of everything else? Various funding strategies to cover costs associated with project development, implementation, operations, and maintenance exist and have been used successfully throughout Los Angeles County. Come hear from public agencies about funding strategies that have worked and lessons learned, including Public-Private Partnerships (P3), development of a stormwater funding ballot measure, regional funding, and partnerships with neighboring agencies. The City of Culver City has utilized all these approaches and is ready to share challenges, lessons learned, strategies to overcome challenges, and recommendations for other agencies to consider. Come learn how you can identify opportunities within your community!

Proficiency Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
1. Identify opportunities for Public-Private Partnerships (P3) to help finance regional stormwater projects that benefit both the public and private entities.
2. Advocate for a stormwater funding ballot measure based on an understanding of the benefits, challenges that will be faced, and strategies to overcome those challenges.
3. Discuss partnership opportunities with neighboring jurisdictions in an effort to finance multi-benefit stormwater project development, implementation, operations, and maintenance to help meet shared stormwater objectives.


Leveraging Technology to Increase Efficiency and Welcome the Next Generation of Utility Employees

Using the City of Westfield, Massachusetts as an example, this presentation examines how a gradual implementation of technologies has increased efficiency and employee engagement and helped create a more resilient public works department. This session outlines the City’s thoughtful approach to tech, particularly its application of GIS and related technology to complex tasks such as managing its network of water meters and its stormwater assets. Attendees will learn about the benefits of these implementations as well as a positive side effect: by positioning itself as a tech-savvy department, Westfield is able to attract and retain young employees more effectively. In an industry that faces staffing shortages as much of the workforce ages out into retirement, tech is a great selling point for the next generation of Public Works employees.

Proficiency Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
1. Explain asset management technology implementation and how to plan effective and meaningful changes to tech in their municipalities.
2. Identify the benefits of integrating GIS for asset management, and how it improves asset management accuracy and efficiency.
3. Leverage their technology as a recruitment tool.


Leveraging Two Alternative Project Delivery Methods for a Complex Stormwater Project in Denver

Denver Public Works and Parks and Recreation set out to protect several neighborhoods from potential flooding via a complex program known as Platte to Park Hill: Stormwater Systems. The program consists of four separate projects and uses two alternative delivery methods. Upon completion in 2020, the four projects will create new detention areas at two local golf courses, a linear greenway and open channel, and an enlarged outfall that feeds into the Platte River – the final stop for water flows in the drainage basin. The program aims to meet city goals of providing flood protection, increasing neighborhood connectivity, enhancing public spaces, and implementing green infrastructure to improve water quality. Despite these unified goals, the projects are in different locations, with their own complexities, elements, stakeholders, costs, and staff. In this presentation, the public works team will share how they tackled the complex initiative using two delivery methods – design-build and integrated contractor (IC), a city term. They will provide insight into alternative delivery and highlight challenges faced and lessons learned from working within urbanized and trafficked areas and how communication among and between project teams and with nearby communities was critical to the program’s success.

Proficiency Level: Applied

Learning Objectives
1. Create and deploy integrated design-build/IC teams across multiple projects, especially looking at environmental, stakeholder, and utility needs.
2. Collaborate with and engage multiple project partners to achieve one goal via alternative delivery methods.
3. Prepare organizations to handle design-build and IC projects utilizing key components and advantages for each.


Orange County Stormwater Tools: Asset Management and Watershed Plan Implementation through an Open-Source Application

Brought to you in part by:

Municipal stormwater permittees in Orange County (OC) are undertaking an effort to standardize and improve their stormwater BMP inventories and build tools to manage and analyze these assets. To support these efforts the OC permittees are building an open-source web application – OC Stormwater Tools. This application is designed to facilitate collaboration between permittees for several purposes such as developing high-resolution inventories of BMP asset datasets, performing inspections and maintenance tracking, delineating drainage area, surveying land use conditions related to California Trash Provisions, and quantifying BMP pollutant load reduction performance. This platform provides dashboards, data summaries, and maps to help prioritize capital and O&M expenditures while streamlining regulatory reporting. With the application, the Permittees are working toward a vision where valuable datasets grow over time, decision-making is supported by the underlying data, and reporting is simplified. The application is open source via GNU Affero General Public License and can be freely redistributed and/or modified under the terms of the open-source license. As a result, the open-source nature of the tool creates opportunities to partner with others to expand and benefit from this project.

Proficiency Level: Applied

Learning Objectives
1. Integrate and standardize stormwater BMP inventories and inspections.
2. Identify BMP deficiencies and prioritize maintenance.
3. Perform drainage area delineations.


Solving Urban Flooding in Vegas – How to Build Flood Resilient Communities at a Regional Level

For the past three decades, the Clark County Regional Flood Control District has provided nearly $2 billion in funding to build flood control facilities that protect life and property in Southern Nevada. The District’s mission is to reduce the impacts of urban flooding by keeping floods away from people and keeping people away from floods. They achieve this goal through stormwater master planning, CIP programming, public outreach, and use of technology such as GIS and virtual reality. This presentation will showcase their extensive public outreach efforts, explain how the District successfully operates across multiple political boundaries, and share best practices and strategies for public works officials and local agencies who are seeking to build flood resilient communities.

Proficiency Level: Introductory

Learning Objectives
1. Identify the key tasks and activities required to plan for, design, construct, and maintain effective flood control facilities.
2. Develop ideas for how to implement impactful and far-reaching public outreach and media strategies, including how to download and deploy our virtual reality flood simulation.
3. Advocate for the formation and funding of a flood control district or similar regional agency to coordinate flood mitigation efforts across multiple political boundaries.


Stormwater Applications of IoT Level Sensors

The Tulare County Resource Management Agency (“RMA”) has installed several IoT water level sensors throughout the county to assist in monitoring stream levels and areas of concern for flooding, the use of which has proved invaluable to flood control operations in the county. The devices use a sonic sensor to determine stream height within 1/100th of a foot, are battery powered with a solar option, and communicate data to the cloud via cellular networks. Alarms and notifications may be set based on data from individual sensors for specific water levels or specific rates of increase in the water level, which may be targeted towards first responders or the public to warn residents of impending road closures or dangerous conditions. This presentation outlines two case studies and one proposed application of the devices. The first case study involves monitoring a bridge where current operations require closing the bridge and removing the guardrails during high flows. The second case study describes the use of two sensors during a flooding event along the Kings River in Tulare County. During this event, various federal, state, and local agencies monitored the data from the devices in conjunction with dam releases and observations to limit the impact of flooding. The proposed application places the devices at various storm water pump stations through the county, which will be used to prioritize resources during emergencies.

Proficiency Level: Applied

Learning Objectives
1. Evaluate the use of IoT flood level sensors in gathering and distributing water level data for use in monitoring water resources and flooding events.
2. Implement new technologies that are cost effective to improve efficiency and reduce risk while managing limited resources during flooding events.
3. Develop emergency warning systems using data from flood level sensors for use in public messaging and decision making by first responders.