Donald C. Stone was an educator, federal planner, and a pioneer of  modern urban public administration.  He was the founder of the American Public Works Association, having organized the merger of its two predecessor organizations in 1937.  He was instrumental in the development of standards for urban financial administration, program budgeting, municipal engineering, and police and crime reporting.

Mr. Stone was also a major figure in the New Deal administration, the Federal Bureau of the Budget, the Marshall Plan, and the Charter of the United Nations.

As Dean of the School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, he developed programs to promote national and international public administration.  His philosophy promoted the  concept of “citizenship” to improve government, to make administration more effective, and to provide responsible leadership and stewardship for future generations.

In 1937, Donald C. Stone merged two organizations into what is today–the American Public Works Association (APWA),  the only association that fully covers the public works profession.  In his honor, we dedicate the APWA Donald C. Stone Center for Leadership Excellence in Public Works (The DCS Center).  The DCS Center will honor Mr. Stone’s legacy and will further contribute to his body of work.  With the challenges and complexities facing the public works profession in the twenty-first century, this historical tie provides context for the role that public works professionals must play in the future.   

The DCS Center is a progressive system of career paths for professional development and credentialing.  The Center represents the first time in the history of APWA that a comprehensive education and credentialing system is in place that defines requirements for all skill levels within public works.   

The Center is a partnership of APWA chapter institutes and academies, colleges, universities, government agencies and associations, working together to provide comprehensive and integrated educational, training and professional development opportunities.  A professional working within public works or considering entering this profession will be able to progress systematically along one or several paths.

The credentialing requirements are rigorous because the challenges before the profession are serious.  APWA has created a developmental model that will require candidates to document growth and, in some instances, defend their work through oral exams.  A mentoring program is part of the developmental process to provide focused support, feedback and guidance to candidates. 

APWA is excited about this opportunity to highlight the public works profession and to prepare its professionals for tomorrow’s challenges.