15
JAN
0

Are you looking for a way to demonstrate the sustainability of the projects you are working on?

 

A growing number of executives at leading global infrastructure consulting and engineering firms believe that the key to sustainability, which includes balancing the need for economic development with the imperative to use resources prudently, goes well beyond buildings and must include surrounding infrastructure – power, transportation, building campuses, telecommunications, waste and water and wastewater, and all elements must be integrated. A growing number of these profession­als also believe that it is necessary to develop a sustainability rating system for infra­structure, modeled on LEED and based on agreed-upon, and in many cases, quantifi­able metrics.  Such a system would provide a consensus-based measure of how localities are doing in bringing sustainability to their communities, as well as provide a clear yard­stick for achievement by infrastructure de­velopers, who increasingly need to justify their capital investments to stakeholders on the basis clear criteria.   The Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure (ISI) and the Envision sustainable infrastructure rating system was developed just for this purpose.

The Environmental Business Journal November 10, 2012 article details how ISI has developed and is expanding on the Envision sustainable infrastructure rating system, which does just that. To read all about it, use the link (http://ebionline.org/excerpts/1543-zofnass-project-combines-with-isi-to-generate-metrics-for-sustainable-infrastructure) to access the full article and visit their website.  Provided courtesy of Environmental Business Journal. Click here to learn more about the Consulting & Engineering 2013 edition of Environmental Business Journal and to review all EBJ back issues, go to http://www.ebionline.org/ebj-issues.

 

 

 

13
OCT
0

The Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure (ISI) announced today that the New York City Department of Environmental Protection's (DEP) ongoing $150 million upgrade of Brooklyn's 26th Ward Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) recently earned the Envision sustainable infrastructure rating system's Silver award. The DEP project is the first wastewater treatment plant project in the U.S. to receive an ISI Envision rating system award, and is the seventh Envision-verified infrastructure project overall in North America.

 

The DEP 26th Ward Wastewater Treatment Plant's $150 million project upgrades the plant and provides critical redundancies to ensure it remains in a state of good repair for decades to come. New York City's DEP will be adding a fifth preliminary treatment tank and will be installing new energy efficient and durable main sewage pumps, process air blowers and LED lighting. Additionally, a green roof will be added to the facility, large blowers will be put indoors to reduce noise, and all materials will be reused and recycled whenever possible. As the facility is located adjacent to Hendrix Creek and Jamaica Bay, the design for all the new structures, as well as the location and installation of critical equipment, follows guidelines outlined in DEP's Wastewater Resiliency Plan and meets stringent and updated FEMA Advisory Base Flood Elevation regulations. The ongoing project work is taking place pursuant to an agreement between the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and New York City, with Greeley and Hansen as the design lead on the project.

 

http://sustainableinfrastructure.org/news/news_082515.cfm

 

13
OCT
0

Port Metro Vancouver's Low Level Road project recently received the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure (ISI) Envision sustainable infrastructure rating system's Platinum Award. The project is the first transportation project to receive an ISI Envision-verified sustainable infrastructure rating system award.

 

The Low Level Road Project involved the realignment and elevation of approximately 2.6 kilometers of the Low Level Road in North Vancouver, B.C., providing space for two new rail tracks. The project also eliminated three existing road and rail crossings and provided direct access to major port terminals. In addition, the project addressed safety, recreation and noise challenges associated with port operations along the Low Level Road, including the reconfiguration of three intersections and improved lanes for cyclists. The project also involved the continuation of the Spirit Trail pedestrian walkway, including structures over two creeks and an overpass.

 

The project was designed to enhance rail and port operations as international trade continues to grow, and to address long-standing community safety and traffic congestion challenges in the area. Stantec Consulting, Ltd. was the principal consultant on the project, which was funded by Port Metro Vancouver, port industry, Canadian National Railway, Translink, Canadian Pacific Railway, and the City of North Vancouver.

 

http://sustainableinfrastructure.org/news/port-metro-vancouver.cfm