[This post is an update to Nov. 4, 2013 post "Do you have a story to tell?"]

The Center for Sustainability has received several informative and interesting case studies from across the country that demonstrates the benefits of incorporating sustainability into public works operations.  We are still collecting case studies and posting them on the Center for Sustainability’s webpages.  Consider sharing your sustainability story with your APWA colleagues today. 

 

 

Charlotte Old City Hall Renovation Case Study

The City of Charlotte’s Old City Hall, built in 1925, was energy‐inefficient and a challenge to maintain comfortable working conditions prior to extensive energy renovations. The work, funded by an Energy Efficiency & Conversation Block Grant, decreased building energy consumption by 43%, made the facility much more pleasant to work in, easier to control for maintenance staff and garnered EPA ENERGY STAR designation. Replacement of the control systems, major HVAC renovations, and interior lighting retrofits maximized energy savings and staff efficiencies. These renovations were carefully implemented while preserving the historical integrity of a facility listed in the Historic Landmarks Commission.

 

Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department Steele Creek Division Station
 

The new Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department Steele Creek Division Station opened in September, 2012. The 12,500 square foot facility, housing more than 100 personnel, was designed and constructed under the City of Charlotte’s Policy for Sustainable City Facilities, ensuring sustainable design features. These included insulated concrete foam walls, closed‐loop geothermal heating and cooling system, water‐efficient fixtures, landscaping not requiring irrigation, day lighting technologies, white roof and preliminary set‐up for building integrated photovoltaic. Green space exceeded requirements by 25%, with 53% of construction waste diverted from landfills. CMPD Steele Creek Division earned LEED Gold, with energy use 39% below baseline.

 

Pavement Sustainability Case Study – City of Arlington, Texas
 

The Public Works & Transportation Department for the City of Arlington, Texas published a case study that analyzes the changes they made to their maintenance plan for streets and roads in the city. The department’s goal was to revise their current plan to address the rising number of streets and roads that did not meet minimum overall condition index or OCI.

 

City of Gainesville Credit Basin Project 
 

The City of Gainesville’s Credit Basin Program is designed to recuperate capital costs associated with the purchase of land for master stormwater facilities. The City of Gainesville, in collaboration with the St. Johns River Water Management District, initiated the credit basin program in 2002. The program was created to facilitate redevelopment of properties within the City’s urban core, where land area is at a premium and thus on-site water quality treatment was an impediment to redevelopment. 

 

Urban Drainage and Flood Control District: Sustainability on a Large Scale – Denver Metropolitan Area 
 

In 1965, the Denver metropolitan area was hit with a devastating flood on the South Platte River. Following the flood, an organization of county engineers began meeting to find ways to address drainage problems that crossed jurisdictional boundaries. In 1969, the Colorado General Assembly passed the Urban Drainage and Flood Control Act. The legislation established the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District for the purpose of assisting local governments in the Denver metropolitan area with multi-jurisdictional drainage and flood control problems. The District operates four programs: Master Planning; Floodplain Management; Design, Construction and Maintenance; and Information Services and Flood Warning. The District Board made a commitment to develop a comprehensive floodplain management program to prevent new problems from being created by new development, while “fixing” existing problems. Since 1969 the population of the District has tripled, and yet there are 5000 fewer structures in mapped 100-year floodplains.